What does Memorial Day mean, how is it celebrated, and what are the traditions?

Memorial Day 2022 - Significance, Celebration, and Traditions
Memorial Day

In the United States, Memorial Day is a time to remember people who died while serving in the military. It’s a holiday that is held on the last Monday of May.

This day, which used to be called “Decoration Day,” has roots in the time of the Civil War. On the other hand, Americans now celebrate by getting together with family and going to parades. They also have BBQs outside and take long road trips on the weekends. From 1868 to 1970, Memorial Day was always on May 30. Now, it is always on the last Monday in May. When does it happen this year? May 30, 2022, is the date.

Memorial Day Significance

Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States. It is a day to remember and honour people who died while serving in the military.

Veterans’ Day is a fairly new holiday. In the past, it was called “Armistice Day.” It was set up in 1926 to honour all of the US soldiers who served in World War I.

Memorial Day, on the other hand, is a time to remember all soldiers who have died in service.

Celebrations

From dawn until noon, the American flag is flown at half-staff. Many people pay their respects to people who died while serving in the military by visiting their graves or memorials.

On this day, all government offices, schools, businesses, and other places that aren’t needed to run the country will be closed.

Over the years, many businesses have realised that this long holiday is a good time to make money and have come up with deals that customers will like.

The Code of Support Foundation says that it is a very important day for many people who have lost loved ones in the military. Some people think that saying “Happy Memorial Day” makes the day seem more like a party than the day of honour and rememberance that it is.

The Code of Support Foundation suggests that you can say “I wish you a meaningful Memorial Day” instead of “Happy Memorial Day.”

Memorial Day’s History

Memorial Day is a solemn day to remember those who died while serving their country. The US Department of Veterans Affairs says that it started during the American Civil War.

After the Civil War ended in 1865, people asked for the first national cemeteries to be built. They started setting up memorial services for Civil War soldiers who had died in their own towns.

In the years that followed, Americans began to honour the many soldiers who died by putting flowers on their graves.

Before World War I, this day was used to honour people who fought in the Civil War. After the war is over, all Americans who died in the military are remembered. It was made a national holiday in 1971 when Congress passed a law making it so.

Traditions

People wear red poppies on Memorial Day to remember the people who died in wars for the United States. This is a tradition that started with John McCrae’s poem “In Flanders Fields,” which was written in 1915. Moina Michael of the U.S. and Anna E. Guerin of France were moved by the image of red poppies scattered across cross-shaped grave markers in the poem. They decided to sell fake poppies as a way to raise money for children who had been hurt by the war. As a sign of respect, a poppy is now something that many Americans wear on their shirts.

Flag at half-staff: The flag should be flown at half-staff until noon, when it should be raised to full-staff until sunset, according to federal rules.

Playing “Taps”: During the Civil War, a US general thought the bugle call that meant it was time to go to bed could use more melodic music. He wrote the notes for “Taps” in 1862. Another officer chose the bugle melody for a funeral because he was afraid that the usual firing of rifles would look like an attack. “Taps” is now a traditional part of Memorial Day.

Visit a Veteran Cemetery: Some of the graves in a veteran cemetery aren’t cared for or decorated by their families. Don’t forget to bring flowers to a grave that doesn’t have any.

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